CBDC Publications

From time to time, CBDC publishes short reports from the local recording community on various topics related to biodiversity and recording in Cumbria. If you wish to contribute a document to be considered for publication on the CBDC website please contact our Recording Officer.

Two New Publications for 2021: 

No 6. Checklist of Cumbrian Coleoptera

No 7.  A List of Birds in Cumbria

No 6. Checklist of Cumbrian Coleoptera

This checklist by John Read covers all the valid names of 2,388 species of Coleoptera from 90 families known to occur in Cumbria, England, UK (vice counties 69 Westmorland and 70 Cumberland), along with their author(s) names and year of description using the most recent classification framework.

Download (PDF): Checklist of Cumbrian Coleoptera, including VC69 & VC 70


Checklist of Cumbrian Coleoptera 2021

No 7.  A List of the Birds of Cumbria

This publication presents a new and authoritative list of the species of bird known to have occurred in Cumbria since 1800. Amongst other things it explains the criteria used to determine which species are included (and which excluded), shows which subspecies occur in the county, indicates the conservation status of the species and provides a brief summary of the status of the species in the county.

Download (PDF):  A List of Birds of Cumbria


Checklist of Cumbrian Coleoptera 2021

No 1. Inventory of Urban Gull Colonies in Cumbria

The past fifty or so years have seen a dramatic increase in the numbers of Lesser Black-backed Gulls and Herring Gulls breeding in urban areas in Cumbria. Great Black-backed Gulls have also taken to breeding in built-up areas but in much smaller numbers. To the end of the 2015 breeding season a total of 45 urban gull colonies had been identified in the county. This short report provides an inventory of these colonies, together with an indication of their current size, nesting habitat, and, where known, their date of formation. NEW REVISION NOW AVAILABLE.

Download (PDF):No 1. Inventory of Urban Gull Colonies in Cumbria

Birds in Cumberland in the 18th Century

No. 2 Pug Moths of Lancashire and Cumbria

Brian Hancock provides an extremely useful guide to the locally resident species of a group of moths that can provide some identification challenges to recorders; the pug moths. With the helpful aid of annotated images, maps and graphs, each of the 42 species is given an individual account detailing identification, distribution, status, flight period and food plants. There are also tips on how and where a recorder might find the more uncommon species and references to some of the most significant records.

Download (PDF):
No. 2 Pug Moths of Lancashire and Cumbria

Birds in Cumberland in the 18th Century

No 3. Ornithology in Cumbria in the 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th Centuries:  A Bibliography.

This document presents a list with full bibliographic details of publications relating to birds in Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire North of the Sands published between the 16th and 19th centuries, together with details of where copies of the documents can be found (if known).

Download (PDF):
No 3. Ornithology in Cumbria in the 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th Centuries: A Bibliography.

Birds in Cumberland in the 18th Century

No 3b. Bibliography of Ornithology in Cumbria, Part B, 1900-1949.

This report is a compilation of material published between 1900 and 1949 inclusive on the ornithology of Cumbria. It has been drawn up partly on the basis of four previous bibliographies, those by Mullens et al (1920), Shackleton (2010), and Armsby (2015), together with additional material identified during the preparation of this document.

Download (PDF): No 5. Transcripts of the Annual Reports of the Natural History Record Bureau, Carlisle, 1902-1912

Transcripts of NHRB 1902-1912

No 4. Birds in Cumberland in the 18th Century

J. Heysham’s ‘A Catalogue of Cumberland Animals’ published in 1794 includes the first serious attempt to list the birds found in Cumberland.
Robin Sellers, a local ornithologist, has transcribed, annotated and edited the section listing the Cumberland birds.

Download (PDF):No 4. Birds in Cumberland in the 18th Century

Birds in Cumberland in the 18th Century

No 5. Transcripts of the Annual Reports of the Natural History Record Bureau, Carlisle, 1902-1912.

In 1902 Carlisle Museum established a special unit called the Natural History Record Bureau to act as a focus for the collection of records about natural history in the area around Carlisle and Lakeland generally, and in so doing, created what was in effect Britain’s first biological records centre. In the twelve years of its existence the Natural History Record Bureau’s principal output was its annual report, published initially in the Carlisle Journal, the city’s twice weekly newspaper, and later in The Zoologist. This document presents a transcription of these annual reports.

Download (PDF): No 5. Transcripts of the Annual Reports of the Natural History Record Bureau, Carlisle, 1902-1912

Transcripts of NHRB 1902-1912

Friday, September 10th, 2021 at 9:39am
#KMF2021 We Are Ready!

The sun has come out as the final pieces of the festival jigsaw are put into place.

What an absolutely stunning backdrop. We think this year is going to be an absolute blast.

🏊‍♀️🚴‍♂️🏃‍♀️😎 https://t.co/Wdnf5aVYAq
CumbriaBDC photo
Friday, September 10th, 2021 at 8:32am
At Keswick Mountain Festival this weekend? Help us record the wildlife... visit CBDC website to see how. https://t.co/WWhAxrZGfk or Visit us at F05 on Saturday to get involved. @cumbriawildlife @KeswickFestival https://t.co/GQC2A5N0En CumbriaBDC photo
Friday, July 23rd, 2021 at 6:04am
@SocketedAxes @TullieHouse The Tullie Secret Garden has a juvenile or two "stranded" every year. It's parent will visit it and it will be OK. They are very noisy and the call is very poignant so it will tug at your heart strings!
Thursday, May 20th, 2021 at 5:33am
Finally! While the rest of the UK flowering season is well under way, it's taken until yesterday to see my first Early Purple Orchid of 2021 in #Shetland. Growing in a serpentine fell field, they're always tiny, but share their home with other special plants, like Moss Campion. https://t.co/GYBQp2nHwZ CumbriaBDC photo