CBDC Publications

From time to time, CBDC publishes short reports from the local recording community on various topics related to biodiversity and recording in Cumbria. If you wish to contribute a document to be considered for publication on the CBDC website please contact our Recording Officer.

NEW:   No 4. Birds in Cumberland in the 18th Century

J. Heysham’s ‘A Catalogue of Cumberland Animals’ published in 1794 includes the first serious attempt to list the birds found in Cumberland.
Robin Sellers, a local ornithologist, has transcribed, annotated and edited the section listing the Cumberland birds.

Download (PDF):
No 4. Birds in Cumberland in the 18th Century

Birds in Cumberland in the 18th Century

No 1. Inventory of Urban Gull Colonies in Cumbria

The past fifty or so years have seen a dramatic increase in the numbers of Lesser Black-backed Gulls and Herring Gulls breeding in urban areas in Cumbria. Great Black-backed Gulls have also taken to breeding in built-up areas but in much smaller numbers. To the end of the 2015 breeding season a total of 45 urban gull colonies had been identified in the county. This short report provides an inventory of these colonies, together with an indication of their current size, nesting habitat, and, where known, their date of formation. NEW REVISION NOW AVAILABLE.

Download (PDF):
No 1. Inventory of Urban Gull Colonies in Cumbria

Birds in Cumberland in the 18th Century

No. 2 Pug Moths of Lancashire and Cumbria

Brian Hancock provides an extremely useful guide to the locally resident species of a group of moths that can provide some identification challenges to recorders; the pug moths. With the helpful aid of annotated images, maps and graphs, each of the 42 species is given an individual account detailing identification, distribution, status, flight period and food plants. There are also tips on how and where a recorder might find the more uncommon species and references to some of the most significant records.

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No. 2 Pug Moths of Lancashire and Cumbria

Birds in Cumberland in the 18th Century

No 3. Ornithology in Cumbria in the 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th Centuries: A Bibliography.

This document presents a list with full bibliographic details of publications relating to birds in Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire North of the Sands published between the 16th and 19th centuries, together with details of where copies of the documents can be found (if known).

Download (PDF):
No 3. Ornithology in Cumbria in the 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th Centuries: A Bibliography.

Birds in Cumberland in the 18th Century

Friday, July 17th, 2020 at 7:51am
I am very happy to let you know that my book
'The Fresh and the Salt. The Story of the Solway'
will be published by the wonderful @BirlinnBooks in early September.
And thank you, @MarkCocker2 & @david_gange, for your very kind words.
https://t.co/HkDiIAqWUf https://t.co/ody8cnlQdz
CumbriaBDC photo
Monday, July 6th, 2020 at 6:58am
‘We’re Good to Go’ and we've taken all necessary steps to keep visitors and staff safe. We're excited to announce a phased reopening from Wed 8 July. https://t.co/KOdHh3ctEW
@ace_national @EmperorHadrian @DiscoverCarlisl @LakeDistrictPR #GoodToGo #VisitBritain #VisitEngland https://t.co/F0jR7FNkwR
CumbriaBDC photo
Friday, July 3rd, 2020 at 6:07am
Young mudshrimps Corophium are growing & moulting right now; a friend once described the piles of cast exoskeletons as 'like snow-drifts' along the shore. Not quite such dramatic nos. here but I was thrilled to find them - the long antennae are clearly seen https://t.co/Fmtf33Duf9 CumbriaBDC photo
Thursday, June 25th, 2020 at 5:41am
Two Fabulous Pollinators for Cumbria Recording the Buzz Project. Chrysolina oricalcia (l) & Chrysolina polita (r). Both GB red listed. @CumbriaBDC @TullieHouse @cumbriawildlife @_NFBR @insectweek https://t.co/odpGfan8eW CumbriaBDC photo