Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre

The Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre at Tullie House Museum, Carlisle keeps wildlife information for the county of Cumbria. Tullie House Museum, in its role as a local natural history museum, has collected and disseminated records of wildlife in Cumbria since its inception in 1893. From the early 1990s the Museum has developed a computerised database of species and habitat records in Cumbria and has taken the central role in providing a local biodiversity data service for the county. This role was restyled as Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre (CBDC) in 2010, a not-for-profit organisation hosted by Tullie House Museum and advised by local stakeholders.
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreTuesday, June 18th, 2019 at 12:17am
Record Highlight!

Recently a Ladder-marked longhorn beetle (Saperda scalaris) was found in Coniston by Kerry Miligan and verified by Gary Hedges and Steve Hewitt. This is a nationally scarce beetle and here at the CBDC we only have 13 records with the earliest being 1900 from the Carlisle natural history society. This was a fantastic find as we have so few records of this species but also as this was the first record for this location (NY32) with most of the previous recording for this species being found at NY55.

Map shows previous records as well as the most recent (highlighted). Photo shows Ladder-marked longhorn beetle (top, middle) from the Tullie House collection.
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreThursday, June 13th, 2019 at 8:21pm
Great to see new people getting the recording bug.
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreThursday, June 13th, 2019 at 3:16am
Coming Up...7pm June 20th at Tullie House Museum. 125 years of Nature. Details at
https://www.tulliehouse.co.uk/events/125-years-nature
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreThursday, June 13th, 2019 at 1:08am
Our species of the week this week is the Pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca.

The Pied Flycatcher is a passerine which is a little bit bigger than a house sparrow. The male’s markings are distinctive: black and white with a white spot above the beak and across the wing whereas the females are brown with less distinct markings. Around late April early May each year the Pied flycatcher returns to the west of the UK, this is timed to coincide with the high number of caterpillars, which is excellent food for the flycatcher’s chicks.

Unfortunately, climate change is a big threat to the Pied Flycatcher as changes in temperature and weather mean caterpillar numbers in the UK are spiking each year at slightly different times. This means there is often not enough food for the newly hatched chicks. Though the population is still relatively stable worldwide, and flycatchers are still considered ‘least concern’. They are still at risk and become more at risk each year as climate change leads to unpredictable change in the flycatchers main UK food resource.

Here at the CBDC we have more than 1500 records of Pied Flycatcher, a large number of these where collected by the Cumbrian Bird Club who created a Cumbria Bird atlas with us between 2008-2013. Our records show that the best month to see them is May and the most recorded location is near Coniston.

The earliest record we have of the Pied Flycatcher was from 1783, of two individuals who were shot. This record came from John Heysham, a Doctor and more famously a Statistician. Heysham recorded births and deaths in Carlisle and carried out a city census in 1780. Some of the work he carried out was still relied on until 1851. As well as this he was a keen naturalist (a recurring theme amongst Doctors), in particular he was interested in design in nature and how that fit with the concept of a God.

Image below shows a male pied wagtail and a sketch of John Heysham.
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreMonday, June 10th, 2019 at 10:13pm
Record Highlight!

It is well and truly recording season so over the next few weeks we will be highlighting some of the interesting records that we receive!

First off at the Keswick Mountain festival on the 18th of May this individual of Ctenophora pectinicorns was found by CBDC volunteer Daisy on a bug hunt. Ctenophora pectinicorns is a species of true crane fly, as well as an indicator of ancient woodland. This species is considered nationally rare and here at the CBDC we only have 20 records of this species in Cumbria with the oldest dated record being 1959.

Images below of the crane fly by Guy Broome and a map showing all past records as well as the most recent (highlighted).
Sunday, June 9th, 2019 at 6:43pm
@SteveTrotter1 @Susans_Farm @PastureForLife @cumbriawildlife #Dave the A-Dor-able Dung Beetle did his bit to raise awareness about Soil Superheroes. Now resting, cozy in his donkey dung. @Team_DUMP
Sunday, June 9th, 2019 at 6:43pm
@SteveTrotter1 @Susans_Farm @PastureForLife @cumbriawildlife #Dave the A-Dor-able Dung Beetle did his bit to raise awareness about Soil Superheroes. Now resting, cozy in his donkey dung. @Team_DUMP
Monday, May 20th, 2019 at 10:41pm
Incalculably lucky to have a day lichening at Haweswater with Allan Pentecost on Monday, as part of #Plantlife’s #Lichen NGB programme. His story of completing 100s of cross sections to compare internal cephalodia between Cumbrian & Scottish Lobaria never gets old! #Legend! https://t.co/vadwOfPs2j CumbriaBDC photo
Monday, May 20th, 2019 at 9:47pm
Simple but interesting and useful survey that everyone can get involved in! https://t.co/AuCvX0Zzjq CumbriaBDC photo