Cumbria GeoConservation Group (CGC) is a voluntary geological conservation group working to record and look after important geological sites. Membership comprises not only earth scientists and members of wildlife bodies, but also volunteers with other skills such as project management and data handling. New members are always welcome.

The Cumbria GeoConservation Group is an affiliated member of Geoconservation UK and seeks to:

  • identify new Local Geological Sites in Cumbria

  • monitor and review existing sites

  • promote the educational value of earth science field locations not only for essential teaching but for recreational and for research purposes

  • liaise with other county or regional Geoconservation groups in the UK

  • maintain responsible access to valued sites

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Tell us about interesting geological sites in Cumbria.

Photo by Peter Standing

See the Geological sites map and search by keywords to find different features.

Currently there are about 280 recorded sites all of which have been evaluated by our members. Site details are logged with Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre (CBDC) and are relayed to Cumbria County Council and planning authorities. CGC operates as a special interest group of Cumbria Wildlife Trust.

Examples of Local Geological Sites suitable for inclusion in the Cumbria GeoConservation system include:

  • rocks and soils exposed in quarries, cuttings, stream sections and coastal localities

  • geomorphological features in the landscape such as areas affected by past glaciation and subsequent deposition, ridges and valleys, moorland and floodplain tracts

  • anthropogenic features including former quarrying, mining, tipping and former industrial sites

Projects link

Read about some of our current and recent projects, including  what happened in Cumbria for Geoweek.

The sites we have listed and that are shown on the interactive map are ones that are accessible without seeking permission, are on Open Access land or visible from public rights of way.  By their very nature some of these sites are in remote areas, open fellside or tidally-flooded shores: wear appropriate clothing and use common sense – safety is your responsibility.

Follow the Countryside Code:

Follow the Geological Society guidance

Those sites which we consider are particularly interesting to the general public are  shown as green dots on the map and for some of these sites there is a choice between a non-technical ‘leaflet’ (downloadable as a pdf) with further details, a map and a photograph or a ‘site data sheet’ with more geological information for the amateur geologist.

Photo by Clive Boulter

Gallery, geological sites around Cumbria.

Post your wow photos of Cumbrian rocks to our Facebook page.

Wednesday, August 14th, 2019 at 9:19pm
SAVE THE DATE: 29th February 2020-CBDC Recorders' Conference. New date will allow everyone time to process 2019 records and provide an opportunity for "hot off the press" reports and presentations. We haven't decided a theme yet...but the date is triggering a few ideas. https://t.co/YJnV1kh5Ev CumbriaBDC photo
Monday, August 12th, 2019 at 10:42pm
Join @NorthPennAONB's FREE #bee walk with @StevenFalk1, Sun 1 Sept at Langdon Beck & Harwood-in- #Teesdale Special #Invertebrate Sites. Late flowering species = fantastic habitat for #bumblebees, solitary bees & more. Beginners welcome. Booking essential: https://t.co/UM9MLLWlUY https://t.co/hSlNm8EKzm CumbriaBDC photo
Sunday, August 11th, 2019 at 10:21pm
@solwaywalker Thanks Ann. Sending it to me is a start we will add it to the Cumbria records. If you have any other records for the Solway I can add them to our List. The volunteers we recruited last year wanted to focus on plants so we are still short on shore data.