Welcome to the Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre

SMALL SKIPPER

SMALL SKIPPER

Thymelicus sylvestris at Low Gelt. This species has been spreading north in Cumbria in recent years. (c)TF

SMALL BLUE

SMALL BLUE

Cupido minimus at Maryport. This species only occurs in Cumbria on brownfield sites in west Cumbria. (c)SH

RINGLET

RINGLET

Aphantopus hyperantus at Lamonby. (c)SH

SMALL TORTOISESHELL

SMALL TORTOISESHELL

Aglais urticae at Walton Moss. (c)TF

CUMBRIA BUTTERFLIES

Members of the Cumbria branch of Butterfly Conservation lead recording and monitoring of Cumbria's butterflies with the support of CBDC on projects such as the Mountain Ringlet survey. The branch organises talks and walks which are a great way of learning more about the county's butterfly fauna; these are added to the CBDC events calendar. For more information please explore the branch website:
http://www.cumbria-butterflies.org.uk

There are also descriptions on the county's species on our sister site, Virtual Fauna of Lakeland, but please note the maps are out of date:
http://www.lakelandwildlife.co.uk/butterflies.htm

 

Where shall I send my butterfly records?

Records should be sent to CBDC using the usual routes including the option of a butterfly-specific template:
Butterfly spreadsheet template: Download file [Excel]

or alternatively via the branch's sighting page:
Cumbria Butterfly and Day-flying Moth sightings

CBDC is the collation point of all butterfly records for Cumbria for Butterfly Conservation's national recording scheme Butterflies for the New Millennium. All records are verified and used for the annual butterfly report in Birds and Wildlife in Cumbria as well as used for local decision-making and research and shared with the national scheme.

Places to talk about Cumbria's butterflies

You can keep up to date with the latest butterfly sightings and the branch newsletter on the Cumbria Butterfly Conservation website and on their twitter feed @BC_Cumbria. Butterflies are also often discussed on the Birding Cumbria yahoo group, and through local Natural History Society forums.