Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre

The Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre at Tullie House Museum, Carlisle keeps wildlife information for the county of Cumbria. Tullie House Museum, in its role as a local natural history museum, has collected and disseminated records of wildlife in Cumbria since its inception in 1893. From the early 1990s the Museum has developed a computerised database of species and habitat records in Cumbria and has taken the central role in providing a local biodiversity data service for the county. This role was restyled as Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre (CBDC) in 2010, a not-for-profit organisation hosted by Tullie House Museum and advised by local stakeholders.
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreFriday, July 21st, 2017 at 9:21pm
The Cumbria Fungi Group has a new facebook page. Please like and follow it to find out information about the group, to share your fungi identification queries, and to look at the upcoming autumn programme.
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreFriday, July 21st, 2017 at 4:14am
**SIGHTING OF THE WEEK** 15th - 22nd July

The Pellucid or Large Pied-Hoverfly (Volucella pellucens) is one of the largest flies in Great Britain. It is a relatively common species with CBDC having 291 records on our database. We found this individual while we were investigating a buff tailed bumblebee nest in the garden walls of Tullie House Museum this morning. It appears to be a female as its eyes do not join in the middle. Although frequently found in woodland from May to October, this species can also be spotted in gardens and hedgerows. Interestingly, the larvae of the pellucid hoverfly live in the underground nests of social bees and wasps. In doing so, the hoverfly larvae have access to the host larvae and waste products as a food source. The adults feed on nectar and pollen, especially on brambles, so look out for them on your local bramble patch.

This species has a cream band around its abdomen similar to another species of hoverfly Leucozona lucorum. You can tell the difference between these two species as L. lucorum’s first two wing veins run to the edge of the wing, however they join together before the edge in V. pellucens. The wings are clear with large dark spots. Its name ‘Pellucid’ is derived from ‘translucently clear’ because you can see directly through its abdomen in certain lighting. Visit the UK Hoverfly Recording Scheme (http://www.hoverfly.org.uk/portal.php) to find out more about these fascinating flies.
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreThursday, July 13th, 2017 at 10:57pm
**SIGHTING OF THE WEEK** 8th-14th July.

Our sighting of the week was found by Paul Kennedy at Talkin Tarn, just south of Brampton, on the 11th July. This species of Net-winged beetle (Pyropterus nigroruber) is not on CBDC’s database, and has only 181 records held with the national database. The NBN Atlas shows a cluster of records in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire, and a few in the Highlands of Scotland. See the link: https://records.nbnatlas.org/occurrences/search?q=lsid:NHMSYS0001719896#tab_mapView.

Pyropterus nigroruber can be confused with the slightly smaller Platycis minutus, but there are some features that separate them. The elytra, or wing cases are brick red in P. nigroruber, and have four carinae or ridges running down their length with weak cross ridges. In comparison, P. minutus is more orange in colour and has more carinae with more pronounced cross ridges. The antennae provide more clues as P. minutus’s antennae are yellowish towards their tips whereas P. nigrorubens has distinct 2nd and 3rd segments (where the 1st segment is nearest the beetle’s head.). These two segments are clearly shorter than the others, and are each of equal length. For superb photographs detailing these features visit the links: https://www.kaefer-der-welt.de/pyropterus_nigroruber.htm and https://www.kaefer-der-welt.de/platycis_minutus.htm

By Quentin Cox (CBDC Volunteer)
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreWednesday, July 12th, 2017 at 12:01am
There is still time to book onto our recording day/workshop at Hay Bridge Nature Reserve on Tuesday 18th July. We will be running the workshop to introduce people to CBDC, biological recording and iRecord (see programme below). If you would like to attend the workshop, or come along and collect some records, please book on our website or email Deb Muscat (manager@cbdc.org.uk).
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreThursday, July 6th, 2017 at 11:35pm
**A NEW SPECIES FOR OUR DATABASE** 1st – 7th July

Our sighting of the week is a “True Bug”, a member of Heteroptera, in the family Miridae or “Soft Bugs”. It is always a topic of conversation in the CBDC office when a species record comes in which, after some checks with our database, proves to be a first for the county. Our database holds information dating back to the beginning of the nineteenth century so new firsts are unusual. However they are occurring more frequently, and the main reason for this is climate change. As temperatures rise, breeding seasons extend in length, and lethal frosts become less of an issue, some species are able to colonise and maintain populations in new areas including Cumbria. On the 30th June 2017 Paul Kennedy found a Deraeocoris flavilinea individual on a fencepost along a track leading to Kingmoor Sidings, in Carlisle. This species first arrived in the UK in 1996 in the south and east and has gradually spread north and west since then.

It is sexually dichromatic in that each sex has different colouration, the female being red-orange and the male much darker, although both are somewhat variable. This photograph, taken by Paul, shows this record is of a male. Both sexes have distinctive pale narrow front and rear margins to the pronotum and paler sides to the scutellum. D. olivaceus, being orange red with similar tibial banding, can be confused with the female of D. flavilinea. However, the former is larger, rarer, and has a hairy fringe to the edge of the scutellum.

The internet provides a wealth of information explaining technical identification characteristics as well as galleries of photographs of just about every taxonomic group in the UK. For information on Heteroptera down to species level try http://www.britishbugs.org.uk/bug_bits.html or explore CBDC’s website for how to get started.

By Quentin Cox (CBDC volunteer)
Friday, July 21st, 2017 at 6:21pm
The Cumbria Fungi Group has a new facebook page. Please like and follow it to find out information about the... https://t.co/VwqXzXXGhL
Thursday, July 13th, 2017 at 7:57pm
**SIGHTING OF THE WEEK** 8th-14th July.

Our sighting of the week was found by Paul Kennedy at Talkin Tarn, just... https://t.co/2I0Ni0bzUA
Tuesday, July 11th, 2017 at 9:02pm
There is still time to book onto our recording day/workshop at Hay Bridge Nature Reserve on Tuesday 18th July. We... https://t.co/av9hOEUGbV
Thursday, July 6th, 2017 at 8:35pm
**A NEW SPECIES FOR OUR DATABASE** 1st – 7th July

Our sighting of the week is a “True Bug”, a member of... https://t.co/gS3yHP4yJG