Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre

The Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre at Tullie House Museum, Carlisle keeps wildlife information for the county of Cumbria. Tullie House Museum, in its role as a local natural history museum, has collected and disseminated records of wildlife in Cumbria since its inception in 1893. From the early 1990s the Museum has developed a computerised database of species and habitat records in Cumbria and has taken the central role in providing a local biodiversity data service for the county. This role was restyled as Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre (CBDC) in 2010, a not-for-profit organisation hosted by Tullie House Museum and advised by local stakeholders.
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreFriday, June 23rd, 2017 at 2:44am
**SIGHTING OF THE WEEK** 17th - 23rd June

The High Brown Fritillary (Argynnis adippe) is the most endangered butterfly in the British Isles. In the UK between 1976 and 2014 its distribution plummeted by 96%, and its abundance by 62%, mainly due to habitat loss. Its European conservation status is “not threatened”, but its current UK distribution is limited to Dartmoor, Exmoor, a small colony in Wales, and on the Morecambe Bay Limestones. This photograph was taken at Arnside Knott by David Cook on the 19th June. To sex this individual the photograph was compared with pinned specimens in the Tullie House Museum Entomological Collections, under the supervision of the museum’s curator Dr. Simon Jackson. This female is typical of Cumbrian records of this species in that it is from the south of the county. Virtually all CBDC records (of which there are 1422) are from the SD 100km square, with just a handful from the southern end of the NY 100km square. In Cumbria, its favoured habitat is a bracken mosaic on limestone outcrops particularly where scrub has been cut back. The caterpillars’s preferred food plants are Common Dog- violet (Viola riviniana), and in particular Hairy Violet (V. hirta) growing on limestone. Bracken areas on upland moorland are too acidic to support violets, so they are unsuitable for High Brown Fritillaries. Conservation methodology is primarily focussed on bracken management providing the right mix of medium and high density bracken patches, thick bracken litter, and open grassy areas which allow the violets to flourish. This is achieved with a mix of cattle grazing, cutting, burning and chemical application.

By Quentin Cox (CBDC Volunteer)
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreTuesday, June 20th, 2017 at 10:36pm
All details for our second recording day to Thornhill Moss & Meadows are now available on our website http://www.cbdc.org.uk/booking_form/. Our site map and species list are available to view. Please book online if you wish to attend. We hope to see you there!
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreSaturday, June 17th, 2017 at 3:37am
** SIGHTING OF THE WEEK ** 9th - 16th May 2017

This week CBDC held its first recording day of the year at Jordan Hills, a privately owned site, in the Eden Valley. Intern Recording Officer Sarah Nicholson found some interesting fruiting bodies (sporocarps), photographs of which were later identified by County Recorder Paul Nichol as Bolbitius titubans(Bull.)Fr .This is more usually known as the Yellow Fieldcap or Egg Yolk Fungus. This is a common and widespread fungi, both in the UK and abroad, and is especially found on straw, older cowpats, recently matured grassland, and woodchips, usually after rain. Bolbitius derives from “cow dung” and “titubans” means staggering which describes the fungi's habit of falling over as it ages. This species is unusual in that it has one of the fastest maturing fruiting bodies or toadstools. To begin with the small cap is egg yolk yellow and egg-shaped. It then expands quickly into a parasol, and develops marginal striations, whilst also changing colour several times. Eventually it turns white and the cap deteriorates. Amazingly, all this can happen in just five or six hours. Although common, the rapid appearance and disappearance of the fruiting body has likely limited the number of county records to 37, with only 12 sightings in the last 15 years. The latest taxonomy defines this week’s fungus as B. titubans var. titubans however, there is also a very rare variant B. titubans var. olivaceus which grows under olive trees, and is also olive in colour!

By Quentin Cox (CBDC Volunteer)
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreWednesday, June 14th, 2017 at 10:35pm
CBDC would like to invite you to attend our next recording day at Thornhill Moss & Meadows on the 24th June. Please see the attached poster for more details. We are developing an online booking form, but you can contact Debs to book too!
Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre
Cumbria Biodiversity Data CentreSaturday, June 10th, 2017 at 1:23am
Thursday, June 22nd, 2017 at 11:44pm
**SIGHTING OF THE WEEK** 17th - 23rd June
The High Brown Fritillary (Argynnis adippe) is the most endangered... https://t.co/wzikVejysO
2
Tuesday, June 20th, 2017 at 7:36pm
All details for our second recording day to Thornhill Moss & Meadows are now available on our website... https://t.co/CVSG528TOp
1
Saturday, June 17th, 2017 at 12:37am
This week CBDC held its first recording day of the year at Jordan Hills, a privately owned site, in the Eden... https://t.co/sv1RTjPEKg
1
Wednesday, June 14th, 2017 at 7:35pm
CBDC would like to invite you to attend our next recording day at Thornhill Moss & Meadows on the 24th June.... https://t.co/Pr2O7LOU0Z